Google wants to see a healthy link profile that signifies authority. This means quality links coming from quality content across the web with a healthy diversity. Are your customers business-to-business (B2B), business-toconsumer (B2C), or both? Do you need very different treatments for each segment? (The answer is probably yes.) A few years ago, a study found that only 4.8% of searchers make it to the second page of search results. Page 3? Only 1.1%. I suppose that’s why they say the best place to hide a dead body is on page two of Google. Your PPC campaign requires quality landing pages in order to perform correctly just as your SEO strategy does.

The mysterious world of scraping

You want to make sure you’re covering topics to the best of your ability and staying away from “thin” content that does not provide any value to searchers. In milliseconds, search engines assess a number of elements — images, keywords, content, metadata, links, etc. — before delivering results. Ever wonder how a small handful of lucky websites make it to the first page of Google’s search results? It’s because they were deemed the best resources for your search query — using an unimaginably complex version of the system described above. It’s not just about creating quality content, but also about knowing your audience, to the extent that the content is useful and has more chances to be ranked higher in the search results for the relevant queries. Google is the dominant search engine in many countries, but not all of them. How you optimize your website depends heavily on the target market for that site, and the search engines that (are) the most important in that market.

Why nofollow links matter

Anyone, who wants to effectively market on the digital platform, essentially has to take the help of SEO practices. The old saying that “life is a journey, not a destination” can also be applied to SEO. One of the first steps you take in a social media marketing campaign is claiming and filling out your social profiles with information about your company from your name and type of business to your address and phone number. This is indexable content and it can indirectly help your local rankings; many third-party review sites mine social media profiles for local business information, which they then compile into entries on their site. Content marketing is about creating content that will help Google to find your site and posts and to ensure you rank highly in the search engine results pages. While this is a powerful and useful effect though, it's actually only one part of what content marketing is about.

Repurpose old Google algorithms

SEO is pretty much based on keywords. The key to a good SEO strategy is to find out what words users type into a search bar when they look for websites like yours. With a list of relevant keywords in your hand, you’ll be a half way there. If search users commonly misspell a keyword, you should identify and use it. Create social media accounts with the major sites and update them regularly. Avoid being spammy by not just posting ads: post pictures of customers, events that you attend relating to your business, and other content that your fans might enjoy. According to Gaz Hall, a UK SEO Consultant : "No proposition development is complete without an honest assessment of what your competitors are up to."

People still ask me about meta tags and its importance today

When you delete a page (or post) from your site, you delete one or more URLs too. That old URL, when visited, will usually return a 404 not found error. But is that what you wanted? Maybe that page should be redirected somewhere. What would you type into a search engine to find your business website or page? Google reported similar findings in 2016, noting that 28 percent of local searches lead to a purchase. Along with the possible irrelevancy for Meta tag data on blogging platforms such as WordPress, the same title tag will be also applied to each page and or post.